A 1928 time capsule

A 1928 time capsule

A nearby home for sale gives a glimpse into California's 1920s architecture (and our own home's history). Built in 1928 and apparently never remodeled, all of its original architectural features except for the kitchen remain intact. I thought it would be fun to tour through the listing photos.

Neighborhood history

In the early 1900s, the Pacific Press -- a Seventh-day Adventist printing press -- was the largest employer in Mountain View, California. It employed several hundred workers and bolstered the nearby downtown district. A local builder turned a chicken farm into several gridded blocks of homes for printing press workers in the late 1920s. Both the house for sale and our own home were built at this time. The Adventist cottages were all humble bungalows, having been built for religious families that moved to the area for factory work.

Architectural style

All of the Adventist cottages share a pared-down Craftsman style. When the neighborhood was built in the late 20s, the Arts and Crafts movement was just fading from popularity. You can see the Craftsman influence in the symmetrical Prairie Craftsman windows in the front, interior trim, and interior built-ins. However, none of the Adventist houses have the characteristic roofline and porch of a Craftsman.

Photo tour

Restoring curb appeal

Restoring curb appeal

Sneak peek: the Nook

Sneak peek: the Nook